To get what Psalm 144:1 means based on its source text, scroll down or follow these links for the original scriptural meaning , biblical context and relative popularity. All rights reserved. What does this saying mean? Action strengthens, and before we have a right to ask for an increase, we must use that already given. He was bold in attack, for he began the combat by going up into the wilderness to defy the enemy. All wisdom and skill are from the Lord, and for them he deserves to be gratefully extolled. Blessed [be] the LORD my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, [and] my fingers to fight: In him our great strength lieth, and to him be blessings more than we are able to utter. Please enter your email address associated with your Salem All-Pass account, then click Continue. Verse 1. It’s never-changing, simple message proclaims the Truth in a way that assists the individual Christian and quietly draws attention to the larger picture of the Church itself. California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. He cannot delay the utterance of his gratitude, he bursts at once into a loud note of praise. Twice taste the sweets of victory in the happiness of gratitude. This psalm is ruled by the numbers ten and seven. Psalm 144: This royal psalm appears to be a compilation from other psalms (8, 18, 33, 102 – 104; but mainly 18). The victories of peace are as much worthy of joyful gratitude as the victories of war. my rock Therefore the poet confirms the prayer for the cutting off (הצמית as in Psalm 94:23) of his enemies and the destruction (האביד, elsewhere אבּד) of the oppressors of his soul (elsewhere צררי) with the words: for I am Thy servant. His best word is given to his best friend -- "Blessed be Jehovah." Blessed be the LORD. For this and a thousand other reasons our trust rests in our God for everything; he never fails us, and we feel boundless confidence in him. "Blessed be the Lord my strength." Verse 1. In him our great strength lieth, and to him be blessings more than we are able to utter. Psalm 144 – War and Peace. We ought not to receive so great a boon as strength to resist evil, to defend truth, and to conquer error, without knowing who gave it to us, and rendering to him the glory of it. 'l-mkân between the words); the former is confirmed from the Hebrew, vid., Ewald, 287, a.)). Praise be to the LORD my Rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle. Cancel. Verse 1. Jonah 3:6, that כּסּה can express the act of covering as an act that is referred to the person himself who covers, and so can obtain a reflexive meaning. KING JAMES VERSION (KJV) TRANSLATION, MEANING, CONTEXT. Psalm 144:1 Blessed be the LORD, my rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle. Two things needful in our holy war -- strength and skill; for the hands and the fingers, for the difficult and the delicate. --Matthew Henry. His best word is given to his best friend - "Blessed be Jehovah." כסה מן, Genesis 18:17) into its opposite, and the clause have the meaning of כּי אליך גּלּיתי, Jeremiah 11:20; Jeremiah 20:12, is hardly conceivable. It may be read, "My Rock"; but this hardly so well consorts with the following words: Which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight. If remembered. He is the one, and teaches the other. Truly it is he who teaches his hands to war and his fingers to fight; and when the final triumph shall be sung in heaven, the victor's song will be, "Not unto me, O Lord, not unto me, but unto thy name give glory, for thy mercy and for thy truth's sake." In the same way, God will not move. He cannot delay the utterance of his gratitude, he bursts at once into a loud note of praise. They are like a breath; their days are like a fleeting shadow. Untrained force is often an injury to the man who possesses it, and it even becomes a danger to those who are round about him; and therefore the Psalmist blesses the Lord as much for teaching as for strength. It seems to us to be highly probable that the Psalmist, remembering that he had trodden some of the same ground before, felt his mind moved to fresh thought, and that the Holy Spirit used this mood for his own high purposes. This tends to make the harmony of heaven perfect when all the singers take their parts; if, we all followed the same score, the music would not be so full and rich. Verse 1. What Psalm 144 means. Let us also bless Jehovah if he has in anything made us efficient. This is not unusual, since a portion from one psalm may be readily excised and adapted for a different usage. Leaders in the Christian church cannot maintain their position except as the Lord preserves to them the mighty influence which ensures obedience and evokes enthusiastic loyalty. 3 LORD, what is man, that thou takest knowledge of him! Ten verses complete the first part of the psalm, which falls into two divisions. So is he himself also our fortress and safe abode: in him we dwell as behind impregnable ramparts and immovable bastions. Thus he taught Samson by abstaining from strong drink, and by suffering no razor to pass over his head. He will never be worsted in the conflict. Men with little scholastic education should be grateful for deftness and skill in their handicrafts. 3 Lord, what is man, that thou takest knowledge of him? Nothing comes of hoarded strength. --Neale and Littledale. He is goodness itself, and he has been unbounded goodness to us. "Who subdueth my people under me." This book of Psalm like many others is written by King David, the ruler of Israel, the man after God’s own heart and the greatest King that ever graced the earth. Probably the immediate reference here is to the use of the bow - placing the arrow, and drawing the string. Psalms 144:1. He is every good thing which we can need for this world or the next. So we, too, should be always beforehand with Satan, ought to fast, even if not tempted to gluttony, and be humble, though not assailed by pride, and so forth. The whole paragraph here ( Psalms 144:1-4) was paraphrased by Delitzsch: "Praise be to Jahve who teaches me to fight and conquer ( Psalms 144:1-2 ), me, the feeble mortal who am strong only `in Him' ( Psalms 144:3-4 )." Here, too, reminiscences of Psalms already read meet us everywhere: cf. 2 He is my loving God and my fortress, my stronghold and my deliverer, my shield, in whom I take refuge, who subdues peoples [] under me. This teaching extends to the smallest members of our frame: the Lord teaches fingers as well as hands; indeed, it sometimes happens that if the finger is not well trained the whole hand is incapable. Used to the hook and harp, and not to the sword and spear; but God hath apted and abled them to feats of arms and warlike exploits. He keeps my natural subjects subject, and my conquered subjects peaceful under my sway. It is all of mercy that he is any of the other good things to us, so that this is a highly comprehensive title. And my fingers to fight - Hebrew, my fingers to the fight. Psalm 144 1 Psalm 144 Of David. It has also a presence about it; for Jehovah is now his strength, and is still teaching him; we ought to make a point of presenting praise while yet the blessing is on the wing. My fingers to fight. "My high tower, and my deliverer." In general, the psalm may be described as the prayer of a king for victory and blessing. My hands for fight, my fingers for war. He was skilful in defence, parrying every attack with Holy Writ; where we, too, in the examples of the saints, may find lessons for the combat. The tuition mentioned was very practical, it was not so much of the brain as of the hands and fingers; for these were the members most needful for conflict. Psalms 144:2. The word rock is the Hebrew way of expressing strength: the grand old language is full of such suggestive symbols. --E.W. Psalm 144:1 is a non-profit organization that serves as a rallying point for all Christians. But that it is one of David's peculiarities to derive from his earlier productions a foundation for new ones, is evident from a variety of facts, which, if any doubt must still be entertained on the subject, would obtain a firm ground to stand upon in this psalm, which can only have been composed by David. Cancel. David was called to be a man of war, and he was eminently successful in his battles; he does not trace this to his good generalship or valour, but to his being taught and strengthened for the war and the fight. Is not the spiritual victory of every believer achieved by God? Seven blessings are prayed for in the second part, four in Psalms 144:12-13 , (valiant sons, beautiful daughters, full storehouses, numerous flocks), and three in Ps 144:14 (labouring oxen, no breach and diminution, no cry). It is true that it would be a complete composition if the passage from Psalms 144:12-15 were dropped; but there are other parts, of David's poems which might be equally self contained if certain verses were omitted; and the same might be said of many uninspired sonnets. With all his strength David blesses the God of his strength. He will gird on the armour provided and commended by God. --John Morison. (2) Ad (apud) te abscondidi, scil. Praise be to the LORD my Rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle. How many times he has appropriated the Lord by that little word My! It is to God the devout warrior sings when he extols him as his strength and stay (Ps 144:1-2). Psalm 18. in which the same ideas and forms of expression occur, there can be no doubt of both having proceeded from the same pen, and that David was the author. Praise be to the LORD my Rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle. Psalms 144:1 NIV. In the Greek Septuagint version of the Bible, and the Latin Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 143 in a slightly … 3 If the Lord deigns to have a hand in such unspiritual work as fighting, surely he will help us to proclaim the gospel and win souls; and then we will bless his name with even greater intensity of heart. He will study the divinely given text book of military tactics and discipline, that he may learn. It does not, therefore, follow that the latter part was added by another hand, nor even that the latter part was a fragment by the same author, appended to the first song merely with the view of preserving it. Find Top Church Sermons, Illustrations, and Preaching Slides on Psalm 144:1-11. Psalms 144:1 NKJV. Perfect for your Tactical Military Army Gear, Backpack, Operator Baseball Cap, Plate Carrier or Vest. Some have understood these words to indicate that atheists are unintelligent. Psalm 144:1, NLT: "A psalm of David. David, you see, was looking for strength for a purpose. As the thumb, so also the fingers signify power, as in David, "jehovah teaches my hands to war, and my fingers to fight," Psalm 144:1; again, "When I look at the heavens, the work of your fingers," Psalm 8:3; and in Luke, "jesus said, if by the finger of god I cast out devils, certainly the kingdom of god is come to you," Luke 11:20. 2 My goodnes and my fortresse, my high tower and my deliuerer, my shield, and he in whome I trust: who subdueth my people vnder me. "Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my finger to fight." This is always of a spirited and feeling nature, and no trace anywhere exists of a dead borrowing. The כסּתי before us only admits of two interpretations: (1) Ad (apud) te texi equals to Thee have I secretly confided it (Rashi, Aben-Ezra, Kimchi, Coccejus, J. H. Michaelis, J. D. Michalis, Rosenmller, Gesenius, and De Wette). Verse 1. Version. NKJV: New King James Version . A prayer for further mercy is fitly begun with a thanksgiving for former mercy; and when we are waiting upon God to bless us, we should stir up ourselves to bless him. or the sonne of man, that thou makest account of him? Verse 1. lead him in a level country, for, as it is said in Isaiah, Isaiah 26:7, in looking up to Jahve, "the path which the righteous man takes is smoothness; Thou makest the course of the righteous smooth." which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight; he took him from being a shepherd, and made him a soldier; and from being the leader of a flock of sheep, to be a general of armies; and all his military skill in marshalling of troops, in leading them on to battle, and bringing them off as well as all his courage and success, were from the Lord: he whose hands and fingers had been used to the shepherd's crook, and to the handling of the harp and lyre, were taught how to handle the sword, the bow, the shield, and spear. Bible Language English. To a fighting man the education of the hands is of far more value than mere book-learning could ever be; he who has to use a sling or a bow needs suitable training, quite as much as a scientific man or a classical professor. Psalm 144:1, CSB: "Blessed be the LORD, my rock who trains my hands for battle and my fingers for warfare." 2 My goodness, and my fortress; my high tower, and my deliverer; my shield, and he in whom I trust; who subdueth my people under me. Thus he taught Gideon to fight with the innumerable host of Midian by sending to their homes twenty-two thousand, and retaining but ten thousand of his soldiers: and then again by reducing that remnant to the little band of three hundred who lapped when brought down to the water. Proud member The verse is also pre-eminently practical, and full of the actual life of every day; for David's days were spent in camps and conflicts. Whole Psalm. Verses 1 and 2 make us think about Psalm 18. [9] Baigent also has a beautiful word on this paragraph: God is full of power, and he becomes the power of those who trust him. Nothing but the disease which closes the eye to manifest fact and opens it to fancy, could have led learned critics to ascribe this song to anybody but David. It has also a presentness about it; for Jehovah is now his strength, and is still teaching him; we ought to make a point of presenting praise while yet the blessing is on the wing. A prayer for further mercy is fitly begun with a thanksgiving for former mercy. The Psalmist in the second part of the verse sets forth the Lord as teacher in the arts of war. If remembered. (c) "rupes mea", Montanus, Tigurine version, Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, &c. so Ainsworth. Deliver me, O jehovah, from the evil man; preserve me from the roan of violence. THE ARGUMENT The matter of this Psalm is partly gratulatory for mercies received, and partly petitionary for further blessings. ; Who devise evils in their heart, who, all the day long, are gathered together for war. Praise be to the LORD my Rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle. That is, he teaches my fingers so that I can skillfully use them in battle. It is only the psalms of David which form the ground work of this new psalm. Probably the immediate reference here is to the use of the bow, -- placing the arrow, and drawing the string. Blessed be the LORD my strength. The strength is made theirs because God is theirs. 2x3" Hook Patch. Alexander well says, "The Davidic origin of this psalm is as marked as that of any in the Psalter.". And the Psalm also further unrolls itself in such now well-known thoughts of the Psalms: For Thy Name's sake, Jahve (Psalm 25:11), quicken me again (Psalm 71:20, and frequently); by virtue of Thy righteousness be pleased to bring my soul out of distress (Psalm 142:8; Psalm 25:17, and frequently); and by virtue of Thy loving-kindness cut off mine enemies (Psalm 54:7). We ought not to receive so great a boon as strength to resist evil, to defend truth, and to conquer error, without knowing who gave it to us, and rendering to him the glory of it. Verse 1. That we cannot think here of such a borrowing; that the appropriation of the earlier language did not proceed from spiritual impotence, but rested upon deeper grounds, is manifest from the consideration of the second part, where the dependence entirely ceases, and where even the opponents of the Davidic authorship have not been able to overlook the strong poetical spirit of the time of David. of As from a lofty watch-tower the believer, trusting in the Lord, looks down upon his enemies. Heb. Verse 1. This tends to make the harmony of heaven perfect when all the singers take their parts; if we all followed the same score, the music would not be so full and rich. A clergyman may be supposed to be taught of God, but people do not allow this to be true of weavers or workers in brass; yet these callings are specially mentioned in the Bible as having been taught to holy women and earnest men when the tabernacle was set up at the first. All wisdom and skill are from the Lord, and for them he deserves to be gratefully extolled. It is not for us to be merely luxuriating in the power which God supplies. As surely as we could say of any poem, this is of Tennyson, or of Longfellow, we may say, This is of David. God is a man of war himself; and he teaches the art of war, as he does husbandry and other things; see Exodus 15:3; and so the Lord furnishes his people, who are here in a militant state, with spiritual armour, to fight against their spiritual enemies; he teaches them how to put it on, and directs them how to make use of every piece of it; as well as gives them boldness to face their enemies, and victory over them. Verse 1. Not only does Jehovah give strength to his saints, but he is their strength. This verse is full of personality; it is mercy shown to David himself which is the subject of grateful song. The praise due to God, both for victories won and skill displayed: "Blessed be", etc. Happy those to whom the Lord gives that noblest victory, conquest and dominion over their own spirits. The true source of his strength: "The Lord my strength." When the heart is in a right state it must praise God, it cannot be restrained; its utterances leap forth as waters forcing their way from a living spring. Men who rule others should thank God if they succeed in the task. What is the meaning of Psalm 14:1 ... Psalm 14:1 and Psalm 53:1 state, "The fool says in his heart, 'There is no God.'" To this significance of the number ten for the first part, allusion is pointedly made in Psalms 144:9 . To war, ... to fight. The verse is also preeminently practical, and full of the actual life of every day; for David's days were spent in camps and conflicts. It seems to have been composed after Saul’s death, and in the beginning of David’s reign, when he was exposed to many perils, both from his own rebellions subjects, and from the Philistines and other foreign enemies, yet so that lie had a good prospect and assurance of a more complete and established felicity. The Psalmist in the second part of the verse sets forth the Lord as teacher in the arts of war. 1 Praise be to the LORD my Rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle. Some people seem to expect strength, but never attempt to put forth their hands to war, and their fingers to fight -- there is so little venturing upon God, so little use of grace given, partly from fear of man, partly from indolence and worldly mindedness. Agamemnon says to Achilles --. Which teacheth.—See Psalm 18:34. The climax should be noted; the rock, or cliff, comes first as the place of refuge, then the fortress or fastness, as a place carefully fortified, then the personal deliverer, without whose intervention escape would have been impossible. This psalm has the title A Psalm of David. Ps 144:1-15. The strength is made theirs because God is theirs. Calmet and others think that this Psalm was composed by David after the death of Absalom; and from a collation of it with. These different figures set forth the varied benefits which come to us from our Lord. The LORD my strength, which teacheth my hands to war. Blessed [be] the Lord my strength. Of David. He trains my hands for war and gives my fingers skill for battle." God is full of power, and he becomes the power of those who trust him. --Albert Barnes. Whoever we may be, and wherever we may be, we need mercy such as can only be found in the infinite God. Let us also bless Jehovah if he has in anything made us efficient. me (Saadia, Calvin, Maurer, Ewald, and Hengstenberg), in favour of which we decide; for it is evident from Genesis 38:14; Deuteronomy 22:12, cf. To a fighting man the education of the hands is of far more value than mere book learning could ever be; he who has to use a sling or a bow needs suitable training, quite as much as a scientific man or a classical professor. on "to do Thy will," Psalm 40:9; on "for Thou art my God," Psalm 40:6, and frequently; on "Thy good Spirit," Psalm 51:14; on "a level country," and the whole petition, Psalm 27:11 (where the expression is "a level path"), together with Psalm 5:9; Psalm 25:4., Psalm 31:4. --Catherine Pennefather, in "Service", 1881. He was steadfast in conflict, for he persevered to the end, till the devil left him, and angels came and ministered unto him; and we, too, should not be content with repelling the first attack, but persevere in our resistance until evil thoughts are put to flight, and heavenly resolutions take their place. Men with little scholastic education should be grateful for deftness and skill in their handicrafts. --Ayguan, in Neale and Littledale. how to bear himself in the thick of the fight. We have no goodness of our own, but the Lord has become goodness to us. Confidently imploring God's interposition against his enemies, he breaks forth into praise and joyful anticipations of the prosperity of his kingdom, when freed from vain and wicked men. David was called to be a man of war, and he was eminently successful in his battles; be does not trace this to his good generalship or valour, but to his being taught and strengthened for the war and the fight. Which teacheth my hands to war - Hebrew, "To the war." --Speaker's Commentary. It may be read, "Mg Rock," but this hardly so well consorts with the following words, "Which teacheth my hands to war and my fingers to fight." An objection has been brought against the Davidic authorship from the "traces of reading" it contains. Blessed be the LORD my strength which teaches my hands to war, and my fingers to fight: Which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight, Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers, Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament. Jahve, with whom he hides himself, is alone able to make known to him what is right and beneficial in the position in which he finds himself, in which he is exposed to temporal and spiritual dangers, and is able to teach him to carry out the recognised will of God ("the will of God, good and well-pleasing and perfect," Romans 12:2); and this it is for which he prays to Him in Psalm 143:10 (רצונך; another reading, רצונך). 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